completely random question about high school

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goodfromfar
Posts: 47
Joined: Mon Dec 10, 2007 10:14 pm

completely random question about high school

Postby goodfromfar » Mon Jan 14, 2008 3:12 am

In your experiences in high school, were the teachers and/or administrators sensitive to any change in a student's performance?

ie, If you suddenly started getting C's and D's when a semester before you were a solid A and B student, would the school pull you aside and talk with you, call your parents, or not even notice?


Just trying to get a feel for what is typical....

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will
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Joined: Sun Nov 04, 2007 3:26 pm

Postby will » Mon Jan 14, 2008 3:19 am

Generally not even notice. On the other hand, my first quarter of AP calculus, I got a C and the teacher tried to pressure me out of the class, but tried to act like my best friend when I got the hang of it and started acing all the assignments.

goodfromfar
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Postby goodfromfar » Mon Jan 14, 2008 3:45 am

that awesome...instead of helping you he tries to get you to leave..

thanks for the input

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quizivex
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Postby quizivex » Mon Jan 14, 2008 4:20 am

In high school, yes, teachers would approach students who were performing uncharacteristically in either direction, either to help identify a problem or to congratulate them. (Administrators were detached from the students, except when they had an excuse to discipline someone.)

I don't think that interaction could happen too much in college physics. Since there may only be 2 or 3 exams in a whole semester, it's hard for any given professor to gauge what he should expect from a particular student, and thus notice any change up or down.

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twistor
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Postby twistor » Tue Jan 15, 2008 11:29 am

No.

cancelled20080417
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Postby cancelled20080417 » Tue Jan 15, 2008 5:39 pm

yes

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fermiboy
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Postby fermiboy » Tue Jan 15, 2008 5:51 pm

Maybe.

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grae313
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Postby grae313 » Tue Jan 15, 2008 7:16 pm

teachers, in the rare case, yes. administrators, heck no!

cancelled20080417
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Postby cancelled20080417 » Tue Jan 15, 2008 7:22 pm

Find the derivative of:
y= ((((((x)^x)^x)^x)^x)^x)^x................infty

Lets c who will do it!







I am posting this here becoz it is " a completely random question about high school"

cancelled20080417
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Postby cancelled20080417 » Tue Jan 15, 2008 7:26 pm

not about but related to..

cancelled20080417
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Postby cancelled20080417 » Wed Jan 16, 2008 1:10 pm

nobody has solved this problem, yet! :o

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quizivex
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Postby quizivex » Wed Jan 16, 2008 1:42 pm

Hm I dunno, I'd like to see the solution...

But to me it just looks like Y(1) = 1, Y for any X > 1 is infinite, and Y for any 0<X<1 is also 1 because taking roots of a number less than 1 gives a larger number closer to 1...

This function is undefined for all negative numbers except for X = -1

So I'd just guess that the derivative is zero in the interval (0,1] and undefined everywhere else...

If this is correct, perhaps you could find the derivative in terms of the funtion itself by taking the log of both sides (as you would do for finding the derivative of X^X) and doing a fancy iterative trick but I have no clue... lol

cancelled20080417
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Postby cancelled20080417 » Wed Jan 16, 2008 9:12 pm

yeah you got it right(very close).
one can write the above eq as y= x^y ( hehehe) and then take the log and all that simple stuff.

don have to assume that it is a real- valued function.

this is jus a high school problem.




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