applying to Medical Physics

  • This has become our largest and most active forum because the physics GRE is just one aspect of getting accepted into a graduate physics program.
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phantom
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applying to Medical Physics

Postby phantom » Wed Jun 27, 2007 1:45 pm

Hi everyone!
I'd like to ask some advice about my chances of getting into a graduate school. I'm planning to apply this coming fall for M.S. in Medical Physics and probably a couple of Ph.D. programs as well. I'm very concerned about my GRE score. I go to a mediocre college with a good science preparation (but not too strong).

My GPA is 3.87.
My GRE (1150): Verbal - 380 and Math - 770; Analytical - 4.5
I had a couple of good opportunities to work at Fermilab over the summer, so I could put that probably in my personal statement.

I'm not American, so this might explain my low score on the verbal portion. However, I'm wondering whether I should take general GRE again. I'm not sure about how I can improve my verbal skills because I studied lots of words from the WORD SMART book, but that didn't seem to help me much. Does anyone have any idea how much verbal portion of GRE counts, especially when you apply to med-related grad programs like medical physics? Do you think I will have a good chance of getting into some decent programs with good GPA, rec letters and personal statement and not very high GRE score?

Also, I'm planning to take GRE Physics because most programs recommend it. Do you think I should really spend time and take it?

Thank you for anyone's input!

apple_fanatic
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what are the odds of this!!

Postby apple_fanatic » Fri Jul 06, 2007 3:04 pm

hey..

I hope you find this as funny and maybe even more interesting than myself... okay here it goes..

My profile is almost identical to yours; I'm currnetly interning at Fermilab..am an international student.. has abou the same GPA as yours..... planning on applying to Medical Physics PhD programs for the fall of 2008... I'm taking the general GREs in August... come from a mediocre college.. am not planning on taking the Physics GREs.. (too much work...Iol)

and yeah.. I came across this post and I just had to register to this forum and send you a message...

Hey keep in touch

apple fanat...............

phantom
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Postby phantom » Fri Jul 06, 2007 6:20 pm

:lol: that is quite funny! have u decided what schools you'll be applying to?
Good luck on your GRE!
Yeah, I think I'm gonna try to take GRE Physics in December... and I'm trying to study for it right now which is not going too great, but slowly progressing in the right direction :)

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Helio
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Postby Helio » Sat Jul 07, 2007 7:53 pm


PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2007 7:04 pm Post subject: what are the odds of this!!
hey..

I hope you find this as funny and maybe even more interesting than myself... okay here it goes..

My profile is almost identical to yours; I'm currnetly interning at Fermilab..am an international student.. has abou the same GPA as yours..... planning on applying to Medical Physics PhD programs for the fall of 2008... I'm taking the general GREs in August... come from a mediocre college.. am not planning on taking the Physics GREs.. (too much work...Iol)

and yeah.. I came across this post and I just had to register to this forum and send you a message...

Hey keep in touch

apple fanat...............


Just a quick question, sry if it is off topic.... How did you get a internship as an international at FNAL? Are you a permanent resident?

apple_fanatic
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Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:54 pm

PREDICAMENT

Postby apple_fanatic » Mon Jul 09, 2007 10:55 am

I've reached a consesus that I'm not taking the Physicis GRE... because basically I really really don't feel like studying for them...for various reasons hence the schools I'm applying to do not require them;
Duke
Purdue
Georgia Tech
U. of Missouri
RPI
(I've contacted all the schools with the exception of U of Miss.

I guess another reason why I'm not stressing about the Physics GRE is that I'm also interested in Industrial engineering/Operations research...... hence this fall I'm gona be applying to 2 different programs (ironic huh!)..
So my basic aim is to nail the general GREs....I mean really nail them... and I'll see from there....

where are you planning on applying to yourself?

apple_fanatic
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Answer to Helio

Postby apple_fanatic » Mon Jul 16, 2007 4:49 pm

hey..

No I'm not a permanent resident nor do I have a green card... but a coupleof International students are accepted at Fermilab.... and I applied to the SIST program...
just google SIST - Fermilab and you'll find all the information you need...

phantom
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Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2007 1:22 pm

Postby phantom » Wed Jul 18, 2007 3:54 pm

hey apple_fanatic,

yeah, I actually applied to SIST program once and didn't make it... then you must have really good grades and recommendations since that place is pretty competitive. Which dept are you working at Fermilab?
So from your list of schools, I've seleced to apply to Duke and Purdue. Do the other schools have med physics program as well, or you're applying to the other program there? I'm applying to about 5 other schools:
UW Madison
Columbia University
Virginia Commonwealth Univ.
Wayne State University
U of C

i'm applying this fall as well... but I'm leaning more toward M.S. programs. Why do you want to do Ph.D. and not M.S.?
Good luck at Fermilab!

apple_fanatic
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hey.....

Postby apple_fanatic » Wed Jul 18, 2007 4:53 pm

Its all about the money.... what I mean is that, I can't pay for Grad school.. nor can I get a loan from someone.. so hey whats 2 extra years doing something you might spend the rest of your life doing!!

anyways... truthfully I'm sucker for school, I do not regard myself as a erudite but my intention has always been to get a doctrate so yeah!!

U. of Missouri - its an accredited Medical Physics instituion
RPI is not accredited but the program is there.
as well as all the other ones

did you know? Duke accepted 4 - out of 105 for 2007 (its actually 7 but the other 3 are paying 40+K a year)
Viginia Comon Wealth accepted 3 - 50+
U of Wisc. recommends the Physics GRE (I'm running away from them)
Purdue's program should be accredited in the next 2 yrs...

these are som of the stats I can remember from the top of my head...hope I didn't scare you or anything.. but thats the reality of it... I would recommend you call and or email all the schools you are planning on applying to and not just their website info... (after talking to some profs. and secretaries you kinda get a heads up on what you need to do/ whether you think you can get in)

good luck... and I'm always open to advice or recommendations... one is never well learned to learn from others..

apple_fanat

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Helio
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Postby Helio » Fri Jul 20, 2007 3:16 pm

Thanks a lot for the information

sophia_xuqing
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about medical physics

Postby sophia_xuqing » Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:40 am

HI, everyone,
so glad here to see friends who want to apply for physics graduate study
I also want to apply for medical physics.
I was majored in applied physics undergraduate, 3.3gpa
and gre: verbal 460, quantitive780, writting3.5
However, I am not majored in Theoretical physics, (speciality in particle physics), and i have not got any excellant research results or write any paper.
Besides, my backgroud has nothing to do medical physics.
I would like here to inquire you friends, would the master experience affect my application a lot? its is said that the professor would like students who has the related experience . But for me, i am very confused, how can i tell the professor that i can do another field well? there is no proof...

apple_fanatic
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hey....

Postby apple_fanatic » Tue Aug 07, 2007 10:42 pm

Hey Sophia,

I couldn't really exactly get your post cleary, i.e Have you graduated already? you do not have any EXCELLENT research experience? and you talked about the master experience affecting your application? I'm really lost....

phantom
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hey...

Postby phantom » Wed Aug 08, 2007 2:49 pm

apple_fanatic,
regarding your reply on July 20th, I just wanted to add a couple of words...
I found out that Virginia Commonwealth Univ has only PhD program, so there might be some chance for you :) However, I still believe that it's easier to get into Master's programs comparing with the PhD programs just because the requirements are a little bit lower. So if you're really interested in med physics, maybe you should consider applying to both. Even if you get accepted to only Master's, you can always reapply later for PhD.
so you still haven't told me which dept you're working at Fermi? I'm just curious... don't worry I'm not gonna go searching for you :)
Have u written your personal statement? Do you know anything whether we can pretty much write one statement and use it for all the applications?
thanks...

sophia_xuqing
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:26 am

Postby sophia_xuqing » Thu Aug 09, 2007 8:53 am

I dont know why my post reply is gone. I just replied yesterday.
Hi, apple,

Yes, i have already graduated. and i am in the master's study majored in theoretical physics. Since i can't find myself any passion or accomplishment of working in this field, I am going to apply for ph.d in other fields, medical physics would be a very good choice. SInce i am not in U.S, i can begin my graduate through application to univeristies in usa.

My problem is, i am concerned about that whether my master's backgroud will affect my application.
Because the professors all want someone who has the related backgroud to work for them.

What's your idea?

apple_fanatic
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Joined: Fri Jul 06, 2007 2:54 pm

Postby apple_fanatic » Fri Aug 10, 2007 7:07 am

Sophia..

Thiink about an undergrad student, who doesn't have any background in the actual medical physics field..anyway people change careers right!! if you are really worried about your background I would suggest you contact some of the universities you are planning on applying to and get a feed back from the people themselves.

Personally I think having a Masters degree is an added + to your application..

keep us posted..

apple fanat

apple_fanatic
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phantom

Postby apple_fanatic » Fri Aug 10, 2007 7:21 am

phantom

No doubt, getting into a masters program should be easier, but for me as I indicated in the last posts or so..its all about the money for me.. I just cannot afford paying for a Masters program.
Well in my understanding most programs(not all) will offer their unaccepted good phd applicants a masters degree option...

as for Fermilab, today is my last day and I was working on the 13th floor, for the ILC DIVISION...(I dont really care if you know my real identity.. my real name is a APPLE and my last is Fanatic......LOL)

later
apple_fanat

sophia_xuqing
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hi, apple

Postby sophia_xuqing » Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:34 pm

Thank u very much for ur reply, Apple.
Its really great that u have an internship at Fermi lab.
I am not an American native either, and I can not afford the tuition fees or cost of living, So i'd also have to apply for ph.d which can cover all these expense. :D
But i just have no chance to go to U.S to meet those professors face to face, let alone doing any internship, :? So I feel so proud of you that you can get in real touch with Fermi lab. and i think you will have a definite great success in application.
Dont know if there's any other ways of contact except posting here?

Keep in touch.
Regards,
xuqing@smail.hust.edu.cn
Last edited by sophia_xuqing on Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

sophia_xuqing
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Hi, phantom

Postby sophia_xuqing » Fri Aug 10, 2007 8:51 pm

Hi, phantom
I think except the verbal part, you have done pretty good on the Q and AW.
And physics admission should emphasize the Q part more than V, I think.

Since you are a native student (I guess from what u have said) to apply for a master enrollment, You will have more chances to get to know valuable information and you also have chance to visit those professors who you want to apply....And all these would be your superiority.
Besides, I think the GRE physics SUB is possibly a better proof than GRE general for your eligibility.
There are much more guidance in U.S universities for students, i think. And i can see there are much links on the website of university which can help u find information about Univ which has medical physics program. I am sure you know better than me. :)

keep in touch.
Regards,
xuqing@smail.hust.edu.cn

BOLAN
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Medical Physics

Postby BOLAN » Sun Aug 12, 2007 11:27 am

just wanted to share my situation. I am planning on appling to a couple medical physics Programs; however my undergraduate degree is in radiation science technology. I definately have experience in the field, i work with in the radition oncology department as a radiation therapist but i also assist with the patient radiation dose calculation , calibration and quality controll aspect of the linear accelarators.
Does anyone think i have a good chance of getting in a msc program? my undrgrad GPA is 3.85; am planning on doing calculus 2and 3 along with 2 more semesters of physics.

tnoviell
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Postby tnoviell » Sun Aug 12, 2007 8:04 pm

For those concerned with getting accepted w/ no experience...

I wouldn't worry about it, I was accepted to Ph.D programs in biophysics and related fields and I haven't much of a biology background. I got two degrees, physics and math, and the only thing they show is that I can read and write. Other than that, I'm still a big chunk of clay to be molded.

And hey, even if things don't work out, at least they were stupid enough to pay for me to give it a shot :)

sophia_xuqing
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Hi, tnoviell

Postby sophia_xuqing » Mon Aug 13, 2007 11:39 am

tnoviell,
I am interested in ur reply.
Is that you have already in the graduate study and doing ph.d now?
I am also very interested in the biophysics field, I am planning to apply for experimental biophysics, ----just like those using STM, AFM,...., use tweezer to move one atom, experimenting on cells, etc (although I am a student of theoretical physics, and doing particle physics speciality :D )
Would you please tell me more information about applying to ph.d without sufficient related field researching backgroud (just like me) ??
Would also like to communicate through any other possible methods .

Best regards
sophia
xuqing@smail.hust.edu.cn

tnoviell
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Postby tnoviell » Mon Aug 13, 2007 11:59 am

Sure, I'll tell you all about it.

Uhm, basically I went to a school where I majored in physics and math, I graduated with almost a 3.8 GPA. I do have 3.5 years experience using STMs and AFMs of all varying brands, as I did research since my freshmen year in college (started my 2nd semester). I did nanotechnology-involved research, dielectrics, and amyloids causing Alzheimer's (only for a short time - I basically just used an AFM to find specific proteins and looked for a code to calculate dipoles of things, I wouldn't call it much experience in biophysics) - I did a lot of work at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

I took only 2 semesters of general chemistry and 1 semester of organic chemistry, and sat in on physical chemistry (I found it was just an easier version of quantum mechanics in the physics department). The only biology experience I have was in high school, I took Honors Biology and AP Biology.

I think overall, it doesn't really matter what field you want to get into, as long as you have research experience of some sort. I think most places expect you to know nothing at all, because during the interview weekends, I had no real knowledge of what they were telling me, I really only understood their set-up and methods.

I only applied to 3 schools total, because it's so damn expensive to apply to places. I applied to Duke for medical physics (got rejected, I figured that was going to happen), SUNY Buffalo for biophysics (they have a really good guy there, Fred Sachs, who was considered for a Nobel), and Johns Hopkins for biophysics, which is where I decided to go, but I haven't started yet.

Just apply to whatever you want, all fields are pretty much related in some sorts. Who would've thought that my research in dielectrics of Martian and Lunar soils would actually be extremely relevant in biophysics? Would've never imagined...

If you want anymore information, please feel free to contact me at thomas.noviello@gmail.com ... just title the email "From PhysicsGRE Forums" or something so I know it's not spam.

IcyWarm
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Medical Physics

Postby IcyWarm » Mon Aug 13, 2007 2:10 pm

Has anyone applied for Harvard-MIT Medical Physics Program?

sophia_xuqing
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Postby sophia_xuqing » Tue Aug 14, 2007 9:33 am

HI, the Harvard-MIt medical program?
the collaboration of two such great universities?
I dont know about this program.
Sounds very excellant, anyway.

tnoviell
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Postby tnoviell » Tue Aug 14, 2007 10:27 am

I was going to apply to that program, I had everything ready to go, but I thought the deadline was a week later than it actually was, so I missed the deadline.

Moral of the story, pay close attention to deadlines.

IcyWarm
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Postby IcyWarm » Tue Aug 14, 2007 11:10 am

tnoviell, are you an international student?

tnoviell
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Postby tnoviell » Tue Aug 14, 2007 11:28 am

Nope, born and raised in the United States...

phantom
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another med school program

Postby phantom » Tue Aug 14, 2007 1:31 pm

IcyWarm,
are you going to apply to Harvard-MIT Medical Physics Program? Do they offer both MS and Ph.D. programs?

This is a question for everyone: is it true that most med physics programs require you to have an interview before they accept you? i've never had an interview when i applied for the undergrad (only for a scholarship), so i'm just wondering what it's like...

thanks,
phantom

tnoviell
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Postby tnoviell » Tue Aug 14, 2007 2:13 pm

I didn't apply for medical physics at Johns Hopkins, but I had to interview for biophysics. Everyone had a series of 8 interviews, 4 one day and 4 the next. Basically, it's just like a job interview, same thing. They'll ask about your research, grades, and other things to get to know you a little better as a person. Nothing to stress out about, really.

IcyWarm
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Postby IcyWarm » Wed Aug 15, 2007 9:30 am

Phantom,
I am thinking of applying to Harvard-MIT program. It depends on my GRE score and of course, GRE Physics is important too. For the interested ones, here is the link:

http://hst.mit.edu/servlet/ControllerSe ... pageid=125

Any suggestions for Physicss GRE Books? I plan to take it in November.

~IcyWarm

tnoviell
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Postby tnoviell » Wed Aug 15, 2007 10:28 am

There are no good PhysicsGRE books, I suggest to go over the practice tests.

I didn't study or prepare for it at all, and I would've done significantly better if I had taken only one week to prepare. There was nothing on the test that was tricky or unusual, I had seen it all before, I just never bothered to shake the cobwebs.

If I could do it over again, I'd look over my old tests from all my physics classes and do the practice GRE tests. Some people have trouble with the time constraint, so people say to sit down and do one of the tests as if you were actually taking it.

I would suggest you take more than a week to prepare though, maybe set aside time a couple months in advance.

IcyWarm
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Postby IcyWarm » Wed Aug 15, 2007 10:33 am

Thanks tnoviell.

apple_fanatic
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tnoviell

Postby apple_fanatic » Sat Aug 18, 2007 7:23 pm

hey...

congrats again on John Hopkins, I've been reading messages needless to stay I feel motivated into getting into a good grad school program....

I know John Hopkins has a Medical Physics prgram, I've tried contacting the department to no avai... so i have 2 questions;

Is the Biophysics program the same as the Medica Physics program at Jophn Hopkins? If not do you mind sharing some of the info....or contacts tot he Medical Physics program..
secondly, is the med physics program at Hopkins aimed toward postgrads or they actually have a PhD program..?
any information would be helpful.

later
kmk6

tnoviell
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Postby tnoviell » Sat Aug 18, 2007 9:38 pm

I have no idea if JHU has a medical physics program, and if they do, it's in no way connected to biophysics. Biophysics is its own department at JHU, by the way.

I did a quick Google search and it doesn't seem like Medical Physics is a track of training for a PhD - maybe for people who have an M.D. or something, but I'm not certain. If I find any information, I'll keep you posted.

apple_fanatic
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HEY...

Postby apple_fanatic » Mon Aug 20, 2007 3:37 pm

I saw the posting on the Meidical Physics site... for JHU on this site.......

http://www.aapm.org/education/noncampep.asp

but i guess there must be a mistake of some kind.

sophia_xuqing
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Postby sophia_xuqing » Tue Aug 21, 2007 8:12 am

Hi, the programs of the school of public health(JHU) also recruit students who have physics backgroud.
http://www.jhsph.edu/researchcenters/
And i see one professor there was graduated from medical physics.
http://faculty.jhsph.edu/?F=Jonathan&L=Links
maybe they will also enroll students from physics department? :lol:
You can ask them for further detail.

victory118
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Postby victory118 » Tue Oct 09, 2007 6:24 am

Hey all,

I'm a new poster on this site and luckily, I also found this thread because I plan to apply for PhD programs in medical physics for fall 2008. To give you some background, I go to UC Berkeley and major in mechanical engineering. I am currently filling up the void in relevant material by taking a bunch of nuclear engineering classes, but I still plan to graduate next spring with a BS in ME.

Can someone evaluate my chances to get in to these schools? I plan on applying to Duke, Columbia, GaTech, Harvard/MIT, UW Madison, Purdue, UChicago, and UCLA.

Born/raised in USA; Chinese-American (don't know if this helps or hurts me)
UGPA: 3.6, Major GPA: 3.7
GRE Q/V/A: 790/590/6.0
GRE Physics: Just took October test; waiting for score
Decent research and recommendations; working on first publication

Also, does anyone know how much the GRE Physics scores are weighted? Most people on this forum said they only skipped a few questions. That worries me because I only answered about 70/100 questions, but I was pretty confident on most of them. My other concern is that I don't really have any safety schools because all of these programs are considered good to excellent. Anyway, thanks for your inputs.

-Victor

tnoviell
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Postby tnoviell » Tue Oct 09, 2007 8:19 am

Just make sure you have one school that you know you will accepted to.

roy
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Re: applying to Medical Physics

Postby roy » Sat May 31, 2008 10:59 pm

What do you guys think about the job opportunities for F1 student in this field (with MS degree in Medical Physics)?
Since most of the jobs will be from hospitals, wouldn't it be hard for us to find a sponsor? As far as I know, not many hospitals are willing to sponsor H1....Let me know if I am wrong.
Otherwise, this is definitely a very great field for us.

audreyh
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Re: applying to Medical Physics

Postby audreyh » Sat Jun 21, 2008 6:04 am

Hi everyone,

Hope everyone's doing well and getting into grad school. I'd like to know how favorable it is to take the Physics GRE when applying for Med Phys. I've looked up most of the programs and a few of them say its required, a large portion say it is optional, and some say its not required. From this data, it seems as if having a Physics GRE score to present to them is a must. Especially for the optionals, I can only assume that with similar accomplishments, the one with the Physics GRE score will be preferred?

My situation is that I completely screwed around the first couple years, so my major GPA is 3.45 and my cumulative GPA is 3.2. I've only just started doing some work simulating experiments like image-guided radiation therapy.

Would you guys suggest I study hard and ace the physics GRE? or perhaps try to find some brilliant work experience?

uncertainty.. gah
thanks for any reply!

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twistor
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Re: applying to Medical Physics

Postby twistor » Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:15 pm

Brilliant work experience is better than a high physics GRE score. I am speaking from experience.

Your GPA is good enough to get you into a state medical physics program like UCLA or U. Wisconsin-Madison but the top schools (Duke, UChicago) are going to a be a longshot. They have very small programs and are highly competitive.

Good luck.

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twistor
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Re: applying to Medical Physics

Postby twistor » Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:20 pm

What do you guys think about the job opportunities for F1 student in this field (with MS degree in Medical Physics)?


Most schools prefer Ph.d. students. There are a few things you can do with a masters in clinical applications and possibly health physics consulting. Researchers will (and rightly should) consider the masters degree a cop-out and you will never find a research position without a Ph.d.

Additionally, if you are applying for a masters student it's going to be extremely difficult for you to get funding. Universities would much rather invest in Ph.d. students.

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twistor
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Re: applying to Medical Physics

Postby twistor » Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:24 pm

I am currently filling up the void in relevant material by taking a bunch of nuclear engineering classes, but I still plan to graduate next spring with a BS in ME.


Schools will probably not view your background as adequate for graduate studies in medical physics. Students with physics background are preferred. You'll have to go out of your way to prove that you have what it takes and frankly it's going to be very hard with more and more physics students applying for the same admissions slots.

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twistor
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Re: applying to Medical Physics

Postby twistor » Mon Jun 23, 2008 1:27 pm

just wanted to share my situation. I am planning on appling to a couple medical physics Programs; however my undergraduate degree is in radiation science technology. I definately have experience in the field, i work with in the radition oncology department as a radiation therapist but i also assist with the patient radiation dose calculation , calibration and quality controll aspect of the linear accelarators.
Does anyone think i have a good chance of getting in a msc program? my undrgrad GPA is 3.85; am planning on doing calculus 2and 3 along with 2 more semesters of physics.


Graduate schools will view your experience as highly desirable. Do not apply for a masters degree if you are serious about doing medical physics because you will be passed over for Ph.d. students. Take as many physics classes as you can handle while maintaining or raising your GPA and you will have little competition for top programs.

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quizivex
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Re: applying to Medical Physics

Postby quizivex » Mon Jun 23, 2008 8:21 pm

ah there goes twistor again, breaking one reply into 4 posts just to pad his lead in the post race... :evil:

audreyh wrote:Would you guys suggest I study hard and ace the physics GRE? or perhaps try to find some brilliant work experience?

Why did you say "or"? How about "AND"!

Both factors will be critical to your success, so why not try to do both things! Don't overlook the GRE in comparison to work experience even if some people downplay it. You should take it especially cuz of your GPA. The GRE itself can overcome a mediocre GPA (to the extent to get into a decent but maybe not top tier pgm) because it can objectively prove you know your basic physics well. Also, at least in my experiences, I found that I had much more control over what comes out of my GRE than what comes out of my work experiences. The latter depends mostly on who you're working with, and with every student boasting some kind of work experience, the only way to stand out in that aspect is to, for instance, get a first author publication or an incredibly stellar recommendation from an influential prof. Still, try your best of course. Conversely, you've got over 3 months until the GREs are given. If you start reviewing for the GRE soon and you make the most out of your summer research work, you'll be in good shape!!

audreyh
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Re: applying to Medical Physics

Postby audreyh » Sat Jun 28, 2008 3:51 pm

thanks everyone for the replies :)

I'll get to work!

jeffreier
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Oct 16, 2008 10:19 am

Re: applying to Medical Physics

Postby jeffreier » Thu Oct 16, 2008 10:41 am

hi all
I am a int'l applicant from china wishing to apply med phy for fall,2009
I am not major in physics but in medicine( radiation oncology track) and will graduate with a bachelor degree of medicine(we have bachelor degree of medicine here in china, same as md in US)
I do not have sufficient academic in physics actually with only one semester in general physics, one semester in radiation physics and one semester of ionizing dosimetry.

I have been a part-time intern in the nuclear medicine department at a big hospital for one year and had 4 month radiation oncologist resident training at a provincial cancer center.
I would like to know whether my clinical experience would help me in the application of a MS/PhD program in US.

Most main courses for ms student in Duke's med phy program including radiobiology, anatomy and physiology, nuclear med, and others I have learned relevant courses in my undergraduate study. Would these help? My GPA is 3.9 and rank the top with a Q800/V540.

jeffreier
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Oct 16, 2008 10:19 am

Re: applying to Medical Physics

Postby jeffreier » Sun Oct 26, 2008 11:45 am

lololo some one help me:(

User avatar
Raio
Posts: 18
Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2009 1:09 am

Re: applying to Medical Physics

Postby Raio » Sun Nov 29, 2009 3:05 am

I think you have a good background, but the same answer will come back again and again, medical physics is over-saturated and that's why (I think) they are trying to restrict (well they are doing it as we as talking) it to Physics BS or to people with Minor In Physics.
having 3.9GPA shows that you're a great applicant, try to talk to some heads of department about your case, and they will give you their input. give it a shot, you have your chances I think




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