Domestic or International?

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nik
Posts: 47
Joined: Sat Nov 09, 2013 7:10 pm

Domestic or International?

Postby nik » Tue Nov 12, 2013 2:14 am

Hello,

I'm originally from South Asia. I obtained US permanent resident status (Green Card) in October 2011. Although I didn't stay in USA due to some unavoidable reasons, I'm still maintaining my US residency and original citizenship.

I didn't do any schooling, academic or job-related activities in USA and currently I'm staying outside USA. I'm applying for Fall 2014. Question is, will I be considered as domestic or international applicant?

Thanks
NIK
Last edited by nik on Thu Feb 06, 2014 5:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

bfollinprm
Posts: 1197
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2009 11:44 am

Re: Domestic or International?

Postby bfollinprm » Tue Nov 12, 2013 2:29 am

nik wrote:Hello,

I'm originally from South Asia. I obtained US permanent resident status (Green Card) in October 2011. Although I didn't stay in USA due to some unavoidable reasons, I'm still maintaining my residency and I'm still a citizen of my country of origin.

I didn't do any schooling, academic or job-related activities in USA and currently I'm staying outside USA. I'm applying for Fall 2014. Question is, will I be considered as domestic or international applicant?

Thanks
NIK


It's not that black and white. There are three reasons international students are treated differently. In order of importance (at least from my perspective), they are:

1. Funding sources and differing costs. You're probably somewhere in the middle here, but leaning to domestic. As a permanent resident, you'll cost domestic (state resident) tuition at most state schools where this matters, and probably qualify for most fellowships the school may have to give out, which increases the flexibility of how the school offers you funding and indirectly improves your chance of admission.

2. Language. You sound fluent. Mostly important because you (almost certainly) have to TA, and TA's that don't speak English don't attract undergrads. Regardless, you won't have to take the TOEFL, so probably a domestic in this regard.

3. Unknown undergrad. You're an international here, as it sounds like you went to school outside the US. As such, it's less likely that committee members will know your recommenders, or give you bonus points for a 'hard' or 'rigorous' undergrad degree.

TakeruK
Posts: 812
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2012 3:05 pm

Re: Domestic or International?

Postby TakeruK » Tue Nov 12, 2013 3:01 pm

Agree with bfollinprm and the 3 points breakdown! The only thing I would disagree with is that you may still have to take the TOEFL at some schools, depending on their rules. Most schools have the requirement that students either have an undergrad degree taught in English to avoid taking the TOEFL, which may or may not be true in your case!




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