Taking a year off

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wololo
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Jan 26, 2013 11:41 am

Taking a year off

Postby wololo » Thu Apr 04, 2013 6:08 pm

I was wondering if deferring my graduate admission for a year would have any negative consequence for my graduate/academic career. I have actually been accepted to a few top physics programs in the US, and I have decided the school I want to attend. According to their webpage deferring the admission for a year is possible and they will be holding my position for the following year. I am very excited to study physics in this school but I feel very fatigued due to my heavy schedule as an undergraduate. Taking 6-7 courses is considered the standard program for physics majors in my school and I did some overloading with graduate courses not to mention the summer internships. I did not have much personal time for travelling or having a good rest, and I have the feeling that it may take a little bit longer than the summer vacation for these.

My questions are:
- Do I have to specify a valid reason? If I tell them that I want to take a year of to have some rest, would it be acceptable?
- Although I am very enthusiastic about studying physics, particularly in the school I will be attending, would the faculty members think otherwise about my enthusiasm? Would they have a prejudice that I will not be a good researcher taking a year for travelling and having some rest?
- Do you know people who have taken a year off? Did they have any negative experience?

bfollinprm
Posts: 1197
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2009 11:44 am

Re: Taking a year off

Postby bfollinprm » Thu Apr 04, 2013 7:00 pm

wololo wrote:I was wondering if deferring my graduate admission for a year would have any negative consequence for my graduate/academic career. I have actually been accepted to a few top physics programs in the US, and I have decided the school I want to attend. According to their webpage deferring the admission for a year is possible and they will be holding my position for the following year. I am very excited to study physics in this school but I feel very fatigued due to my heavy schedule as an undergraduate. Taking 6-7 courses is considered the standard program for physics majors in my school and I did some overloading with graduate courses not to mention the summer internships. I did not have much personal time for travelling or having a good rest, and I have the feeling that it may take a little bit longer than the summer vacation for these.

My questions are:
- Do I have to specify a valid reason? If I tell them that I want to take a year of to have some rest, would it be acceptable?
- Although I am very enthusiastic about studying physics, particularly in the school I will be attending, would the faculty members think otherwise about my enthusiasm? Would they have a prejudice that I will not be a good researcher taking a year for travelling and having some rest?
- Do you know people who have taken a year off? Did they have any negative experience?


I don't think people will care, and I doubt you even need to give a reason. I took 2 years off, and I think it really helped my maturity (not to mention recharged my batteries). I would have a plan for that year, though. Not because they'll ask you for one, but because a year is a long time to be doing nothing (you will get bored by the end of summer, I think). You should definitely plan some major life experience, or get a job, or something.

User avatar
Andromeda
Posts: 127
Joined: Wed Dec 10, 2008 3:17 pm

Re: Taking a year off

Postby Andromeda » Tue Apr 09, 2013 6:04 am

I took off time to travel around the world after undergrad but before grad school and it was the best decision of my life. Do it!

Frankly I was nervous about how it would be received too, but then I realized any institution where they wouldn't understand my interest in going off and doing this likely also wouldn't sport a culture that would make me happy. Love my research, but there's more to my life than just that.




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