How to judge the fame of your potential advisor?

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Joe_Fraizer
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2011 2:55 pm

How to judge the fame of your potential advisor?

Postby Joe_Fraizer » Mon Jul 23, 2012 3:29 am

I hear that how well known your advisors/recommenders plays a big factor when applying for PhD and the life after the PhD with said prof.
But what counts as a well-known or famous professor? I am asking because I want to do a PhD with a professor at University of Hawaii who I know personally and I like him a lot, but I have a good enough resume to get into a top 40-30 University.
Maybe his reputation would counter the not-so-stellar reputation of UHM?

bfollinprm
Posts: 1197
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2009 11:44 am

Re: How to judge the fame of your potential advisor?

Postby bfollinprm » Mon Jul 23, 2012 10:28 am

I want to do a PhD with a professor at University of Hawaii who I know personally and I like him a lot


The most important thing when getting a postdoc is publication history. If you and this prof work well together, then it shouldn't matter the reputation of him or the school; you should go work for him. Making decisions like these will make your PhD infinitely more enjoyable, and if you have a good relationship with your advisor it will be much easier to get papers out anyway.

King Vitamin
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat Nov 12, 2011 5:01 pm

Re: How to judge the fame of your potential advisor?

Postby King Vitamin » Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:16 pm

The best bet is to figure out where their former students went. This usually comes to water cooler gossip type conversations with other students (though I suppose it shouldn't be impolite to ask a potential advisor where their students went).

EDIT: I'll add that I've heard stories of very famous professors getting their former students subpar postdocs.




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