quantum computing

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larry burns
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Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2008 1:12 pm

quantum computing

Postby larry burns » Fri Dec 19, 2008 5:31 am

i've looked into it and it seems to use the math used in quantum mechanics, which i enjoy since its not as theoretical as pure math

but does one need knowledge of computers and enjoy working with ciomputers to do quantum computing? i loathe computers, hearing terms like 'bytes', but am ok with doing programming

btw, i've chosen not to do physics in grad school since theres no non-academia, wallstreet, jobs for theory, and i hate experiments

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zxcv
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Re: quantum computing

Postby zxcv » Fri Dec 19, 2008 7:42 am

I'm confused. Quantum computing uses linear algebra and the math of quantum mechanics, to be sure, but that math can be plenty theoretical as well, depending upon your emphasis.

I also have no idea what you're getting at in terms of "knowledge of computers" that bothers you. Does the word "qubit" bother you? Fortunately "qubytes" seem to be beyond current experimental capabilities :D. Obviously there are a lots of different areas of research interest and ways to approach quantum computing like any other research field. And yes, you'll probably need to be okay using computers, but isn't that true of almost an area of physics research today?

For the most part, though, people who do quantum computing are either computer scientists, physicists or mathematicians. If you're not comfortable in any of those roles, exactly what place do you see yourself occupying?

If you want to get some sense of what's involved in quantum computing from a theoretical side, I'd recommend taking a look at the canonical quantum computing textbook, "Quantum Computation and Quantum Information" by Nielsen and Chuang.

larry burns
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Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2008 1:12 pm

Re: quantum computing

Postby larry burns » Fri Dec 19, 2008 10:18 pm

does the math in quantum computing require math thats really theoretical? (requires a lot of mathematical proofs?) if so, i want to avoid it

yes, the word 'qubit' bothers me. i dont want ot have to know the theory of how computers work and such. the only computer knowledge i want to use is programming

if computer scientists, physicists or mathematicians work in quatnum computing, is it posisble to get a phD or MS in appplied math and then work in quantum computing?

cato88
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Re: quantum computing

Postby cato88 » Fri Dec 19, 2008 11:05 pm

qubit is a quantum computing term. How familiar are you with quantum computing?

larry burns
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Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2008 1:12 pm

Re: quantum computing

Postby larry burns » Sat Dec 20, 2008 1:02 am

i know little about it. thats why i want to avoid it if it require too mcuh knowledge about computer science

pd
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Re: quantum computing

Postby pd » Sat Dec 20, 2008 1:57 am

IMHO, quantum computing is very interdiciplinary. It's important for physicists, computer scientists, mathematicians, and engineers to work together on this. If you want to totally avoid the computer science aspects of it, I'm not sure that's possible. Sure, you could not work on developing algorithms or the like, which is what I'd consider hardcore CS and math, but I imagine you'd need to know at least the basics of what's going on.

I guess the most important question is: What problems do you envision working on?

larry burns
Posts: 77
Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2008 1:12 pm

Re: quantum computing

Postby larry burns » Sat Dec 20, 2008 2:11 am

i dont really care what probs i work on as long as i dont need knowledge of computer science. i would like to do work that involves linear algebra and quantum mechanics though

cato88
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Re: quantum computing

Postby cato88 » Sat Dec 20, 2008 2:39 am

I feel like you either need compsci knowledge to do grunt work tasks or the ability to do proof based math to do more theoretical tasks.

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zxcv
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Re: quantum computing

Postby zxcv » Sat Dec 20, 2008 3:08 pm

There are two basic approaches to quantum computing:
1) Algorithms (computer science)
2) Implementations (physics, either experimental or theoretical)

Both theoretical computer science and theoretical physics can involve tricky math.

It sounds like the algorithms side is not what you're interested in, in which case you should take the approach of a theoretical physicist. But you don't want to do physics either? I think you've ruled out all your options.

You may be able to get a degree in applied math and do quantum computing work, but at this point it matters far more what you work on and who you work with than what field they're nominally in. What quantum computing problems interest you? Who's doing work that you find interesting? Those are questions you'd have to answer before going to grad school in the field.

cato88
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Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2008 12:46 am

Re: quantum computing

Postby cato88 » Sat Dec 20, 2008 3:23 pm

I felt like he was saying i want to do quantum computing but not do the computing or quantum part

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grae313
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Re: quantum computing

Postby grae313 » Sat Dec 20, 2008 5:21 pm

I'm not an expert but as far as I know, "quantum computing" *experimental* research has pretty much nothing to do with computers at this point and won't for many many years. It's all about making systems that exhibit "bit" behavior, as in having two distinct states that can be labeled a 1 or a 0. Once these quantum mechanical systems are created, people are studying the physics of them and learning how to better control them.

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zxcv
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Re: quantum computing

Postby zxcv » Sat Dec 20, 2008 5:41 pm

grae313 wrote:I'm not an expert but as far as I know, "quantum computing" *experimental* research has pretty much nothing to do with computers at this point and won't for many many years.
Too bad he hates experimental science...




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