PhD in Physics After 2yr Absence w/BSEE?

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pavement
Posts: 4
Joined: Tue Jul 08, 2008 10:03 pm

PhD in Physics After 2yr Absence w/BSEE?

Postby pavement » Tue Jul 08, 2008 10:13 pm

Hey all. I'm new to this forum, and really impressed with the way help others out over this medium.

Anywho, I'm interested in High Energy Experimental PhD physics for fall 2009. I got my degree in BSEE from UW-Madison. I took two semester of Quantum Mechanics, Electromagnetics, Photonics, Semiconductors, so have a decent physics background for an EE undergrad at least. The main courses I'm lacking may be statistical mechanics and particle physics. Also have internship at medical physics firm and one summer of research at applied physics lab. Also attended USPAS school with course in Fundaments of Accelerator Physics. Now working 1 yr in engineering firm to pay off undergrad loans.

Given this info, what do you suppose are my chances at decent schools (Univ. Washington, UVA, USC, UCLA, UCSB, Univ. of Oregon, ). Your response would be greatly appreciated.

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noojens
Posts: 187
Joined: Tue Apr 15, 2008 2:59 pm

Re: PhD in Physics After 2yr Absence w/BSEE?

Postby noojens » Wed Jul 09, 2008 11:23 am

I don't think your engineering background will be held against you, particularly not if you're interested in experiment. Also, I wouldn't worry particularly much about not having taken particle physics; many physics departments don't even offer particle physics for undergrads. Your research background is solid and you went to a great school, so as long as you nail your physics GRE and have some positive recommendations from people who know you and your research capabilities, I think your chances are quite good.

Best of luck.




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