Physics GRE for MSc Photonics Program

antew
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2012 11:30 am

Physics GRE for MSc Photonics Program

Postby antew » Sun Dec 23, 2012 12:03 pm

Hi,

I am an Electrical Engineering graduate with a passion for physics since junior high school. And now i want to do a Master

with physics related study area. And I see that photonics is more appropriate for an EE major that other areas of physics.

My question is I want to use Physics GRE to prove my physics skills and use it as a main advantage to get accepted by the grad schools. Do you think it will work? Has anybody used physics GRE to get acceptance into Photonics program?

Thanks a lot.

antew
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Dec 23, 2012 11:30 am

Re: Physics GRE for MSc Photonics Program

Postby antew » Wed Jan 30, 2013 7:01 am

Noboday answering this for weeks? Pls guys help me out here.

I have to make a decision of weather to take the GRE or not.

User avatar
quizivex
Posts: 1029
Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2007 6:13 am

Re: Physics GRE for MSc Photonics Program

Postby quizivex » Wed Jan 30, 2013 11:29 am

I did a quick search and found that photonics research at universities can be in a variety of departments from physics to applied physics to chemistry to engineering to subdepartments of engineering. If the photonics programs you're applying to are part of a physics department, you may have to take the PGRE anyway. If it's part of another department, you won't have to. But you can choose to take it anyway. There is a test date in April. If you get a good score, it could help your application, assuming the profs of that department know what a good PGRE score is. If you get a lousy score, you can just opt not to submit the score with your application.

Whether it's worth the time and effort to take it if you don't need to, I can't say. I really don't know if you can use the PGRE as the "main" basis for acceptance, since even for physics departments it's not the main part of the application. But if there's a chance you might have to take the PGRE anyway for some departments you're applying to, it might be worthwhile to take it.




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