EE THINKING OF CAREER/WORK SHIFT, TO [more] PHYSICS?

BoxOChocos
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 5:20 pm

EE THINKING OF CAREER/WORK SHIFT, TO [more] PHYSICS?

Postby BoxOChocos » Tue Sep 25, 2012 6:58 pm

Hi. So I have a BASc in EE (Microelectronics Engineering - minors in Physics/Math), I have been working as a hardware design engineer (electronics), and I am considering further schooling so that I can do different and/or more technically challenging work. But I am 40 years old, so making a career change is something I am consider carefully.
If making money at a future job wasn't a factor in my decision then I would get a PhD in Physics or Applied Mathematics (attempt to anyway), but I think it is clear that EE and CompSci have more job opportunities. So its seems to me that I have a conflict between my desires and practicalities, but I am trying to blend the two (see below).

Anyway, here are the options that I have come up with, for myself, and I was hoping for some thoughts from the community here on them:
---
STARTING FROM: I'm a hardware design engineer (electronics), BASc in EE (Microelectronics Engineering, with Math and Physics minors), 40 year old, considering doing one of the following for a “work” change (not necessarily a full career change):

OPTION 1) Second BASc degree, in CompSCi (rt / embedded programming focus; maybe some graphics or cryptography)
Time To Complete: 1.33 - 1.66 years
Cost To Complete: $12K (~1/3 of a BaSC Degree cost)
Note: A few discrete math courses would be taken.
Could do course based MEng later, while working (2.5 years to complete that).

OPTION 2) MSc in *Phyics/Applied Math, then PhD in EE (perhaps)
T2C: 2.33-3 year (w/ undergrad makeup) + 2 years of PhD in EE
C2C: $20-$25K; Chance TA and RA funding will cover cost, but not sure since doing split PhD degree (PhD is not just in Physics or just in EE)
Note: I read a PhD in EE can make you overqualified for non-academic jobs

OPTION 3)
MASc masters in EE
T2C: 2-3 years
C2C: $10-$15K, unclear if TA/RA funding will cover this cost but I think it will.
Note: Being able to take some CS / Math / Phys courses would make this option better to me.
(could do PhD in EE in +2 years, but likely would not)

Looking forward to reading thoughts on this.
Thank you.

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HappyQuark
Posts: 762
Joined: Thu Apr 16, 2009 2:08 am

Re: EE THINKING OF CAREER/WORK SHIFT, TO [more] PHYSICS?

Postby HappyQuark » Wed Sep 26, 2012 6:15 pm

BoxOChocos wrote:Hi. So I have a BASc in EE (Microelectronics Engineering - minors in Physics/Math), I have been working as a hardware design engineer (electronics), and I am considering further schooling so that I can do different and/or more technically challenging work. But I am 40 years old, so making a career change is something I am consider carefully.
If making money at a future job wasn't a factor in my decision then I would get a PhD in Physics or Applied Mathematics (attempt to anyway), but I think it is clear that EE and CompSci have more job opportunities. So its seems to me that I have a conflict between my desires and practicalities, but I am trying to blend the two (see below).

Anyway, here are the options that I have come up with, for myself, and I was hoping for some thoughts from the community here on them:
---
STARTING FROM: I'm a hardware design engineer (electronics), BASc in EE (Microelectronics Engineering, with Math and Physics minors), 40 year old, considering doing one of the following for a “work” change (not necessarily a full career change):

OPTION 1) Second BASc degree, in CompSCi (rt / embedded programming focus; maybe some graphics or cryptography)
Time To Complete: 1.33 - 1.66 years
Cost To Complete: $12K (~1/3 of a BaSC Degree cost)
Note: A few discrete math courses would be taken.
Could do course based MEng later, while working (2.5 years to complete that).

OPTION 2) MSc in *Phyics/Applied Math, then PhD in EE (perhaps)
T2C: 2.33-3 year (w/ undergrad makeup) + 2 years of PhD in EE
C2C: $20-$25K; Chance TA and RA funding will cover cost, but not sure since doing split PhD degree (PhD is not just in Physics or just in EE)
Note: I read a PhD in EE can make you overqualified for non-academic jobs

OPTION 3)
MASc masters in EE
T2C: 2-3 years
C2C: $10-$15K, unclear if TA/RA funding will cover this cost but I think it will.
Note: Being able to take some CS / Math / Phys courses would make this option better to me.
(could do PhD in EE in +2 years, but likely would not)

Looking forward to reading thoughts on this.
Thank you.


I don't have any specific advice, except to say you look like an ass when the title of your post is in all caps. Thanks and goodbye.

BoxOChocos
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Sep 25, 2012 5:20 pm

Re: EE THINKING OF CAREER/WORK SHIFT, TO [more] PHYSICS?

Postby BoxOChocos » Mon Oct 08, 2012 6:22 pm

HappyQuark, well not sorry to say that you sir look like an ass for replying just to say... nothing,
of any use.

Didn't anyone every teach you:
"If you got nothing nice to say, you look like an ASS saying it!" ? :mrgreen:

Adios and vaya con dios.

User avatar
HappyQuark
Posts: 762
Joined: Thu Apr 16, 2009 2:08 am

Re: EE THINKING OF CAREER/WORK SHIFT, TO [more] PHYSICS?

Postby HappyQuark » Tue Oct 09, 2012 3:54 am

BoxOChocos wrote:HappyQuark, well not sorry to say that you sir look like an ass for replying just to say... nothing,
of any use.

Didn't anyone every teach you:
"If you got nothing nice to say, you look like an ASS saying it!" ? :mrgreen:

Adios and vaya con dios.


Thank you for addressing me as sir. I've never had anybody insult me in such formal and respectful terms. Regardless, I don't necessarily agree with the lesson you've described here. For example, consider the statement: "cheese exists". This statement isn't "nice" but a person wouldn't look like an ass for saying it.

Image

bfollinprm
Posts: 1197
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2009 11:44 am

Re: EE THINKING OF CAREER/WORK SHIFT, TO [more] PHYSICS?

Postby bfollinprm » Tue Oct 09, 2012 10:44 am

That cheese looks rather plastic-y. Holes are a nice touch, though.


To the OP: You're gonna have to make your own decision. I also tend to think that by further exploring these options, you'll find one or more close due to sufficiently steep entry requirements, that you might not want to surmount at this point of your life.




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