Applying for Applied Physics

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WhoaNonstop
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Applying for Applied Physics

Postby WhoaNonstop » Sat Sep 25, 2010 3:09 pm

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Last edited by WhoaNonstop on Tue Feb 15, 2011 7:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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grae313
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Re: Applying for Applied Physics

Postby grae313 » Wed Sep 29, 2010 3:37 pm

WhoaNonstop wrote:Hey everyone...

I have a very general question. After a year of graduate school I have come to find that I am much more interested in "Applicable Physics" than the fundamental physics. I have been debating making a transfer from my current university to a school that has a program in this specific area. For example, Yale University has an Applied Physics program I would love to apply for, but I am also interested in most of their condensed matter as well. I'm sure there is much overlap between the two.

What is the difference between applying to Applied Physics? I noticed someone didn't need a PGRE score to apply to Yale's Applied Physics program which seems odd. Are they typically easier or harder to get into than the regular programs? Also, if applying to one school, such as Yale, do I need to do two separate applications for Applied/regular?

-Riley


It really depends on the school and the prestige of the various programs involved. At some schools the applied physics programs are more competitive than regular physics, and at other schools it is vice versa. However, transferring really sets you back and you should make sure there isn't any applied physics research going on at your own university. Even if your school does not have a designated applied physics program, there are probably some physics professors doing more applied research, or you also have the option to join a lab outside your department, for example in electrical or computer engineering (cutting edge nanotechnology stuff often comes out of these departments), chemical engineering, mechanical engineering, etc. The word "Applied" on your degree won't make any difference to your career, just the research you do, and you can do applied physics research almost anywhere.

As for two separate applications, most (just about all) universities only let you apply to one department at a time, but you can always contact the admissions secretary and ask that they forward your application to physics if they decide not to admit you in applied physics.

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WhoaNonstop
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Re: Applying for Applied Physics

Postby WhoaNonstop » Thu Sep 30, 2010 5:13 am

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Last edited by WhoaNonstop on Tue Feb 15, 2011 7:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

appliedphysics
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Re: Applying for Applied Physics

Postby appliedphysics » Thu Nov 18, 2010 8:22 pm

Hi, I am currently attending Applied Physics program. It is very hard to predict which program is easier to apply to, Pure or Applied Physics. This is based on your personal background. And it is good that almost every top university offers both. Other schools give degree in Physics or Applied Physics based on the thesis you write. If you have done significant research and course work in the past in applied science, then it will be easier for you to apply for Applied Physics for that most physics program they will look at how you have prepared and demonstrated significant interest in pure physics. But if you did more research in pure physics, then it will be easier for you to apply for physics. Which program to easier to apply to is really hard to say. You should apply to the program based on your interest, and see the available fields and faculty. Most condensed matter researches and biophysics are in applied physics whereas particle physics, string theory, and nuclear physics are popular topics in physics. There is a thread on the rankings of Applied Physics Program if you need.

tradster
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Re: Applying for Applied Physics

Postby tradster » Tue Dec 07, 2010 9:24 pm

Any insight on Cornell's Applied Physics vs Physics? Both departments have faculties that I'm interested in working with. Anyone know which one is more easier to get into?

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WhoaNonstop
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Re: Applying for Applied Physics

Postby WhoaNonstop » Tue Dec 07, 2010 10:26 pm

tradster wrote:Any insight on Cornell's Applied Physics vs Physics? Both departments have faculties that I'm interested in working with. Anyone know which one is more easier to get into?


Considering I have decided to apply to the Physics program, that means the Applied Physics program will be easier to get into. ;)

-Riley




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