steps to this question

j.r.brown
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Joined: Fri Sep 30, 2011 5:42 am

steps to this question

Postby j.r.brown » Fri Sep 30, 2011 5:49 am

what are the steps If a 129.3 kg crate is being pulled across a frictionless surface by a rope with a tension of 200. N and an angle of 30.0 to the horizontal, what is the normal force exerted on the crate? and the answer is 1170N

bfollinprm
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Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2009 11:44 am

Re: steps to this question

Postby bfollinprm » Fri Sep 30, 2011 12:41 pm

1. Find your (high school?) teacher.

2. Admit you didn't pay any attention to his lectures

3. Ask if he has time to help you

4. Listen to him this time; or find a classmate who's capable of same and listen to him/her

5. Work out the problem.

OR

1. Open your textbook

2. Go to the chapter discussing Newton's second law

3. Read it, and pay attention to the example that is exactly this question, with different numbers.

4. Understand the steps, and any minor differences your problem might have

5. Do the problem following the example, substituting your numbers for the ones the example uses.

OR

1. Make your parents get you a tutor, and ask him these questions.

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quizivex
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Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2007 6:13 am

Re: steps to this question

Postby quizivex » Fri Sep 30, 2011 8:29 pm

Nice post, bfollinprm. Especially this part:
bfollinprm wrote:Read it, and pay attention to the example that is exactly this question, with different numbers.

So true. Every intro textbook has the same problem solved as an illustrative example... Perhaps j.r.brown thought it was a different problem because they used the word "box" instead of "crate" in the chapter, or "chain" instead of "rope". :lol:

bfollinprm
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Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2009 11:44 am

Re: steps to this question

Postby bfollinprm » Fri Sep 30, 2011 10:05 pm

No, he just never bothered to open his textbook.

scasplte2
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Re: steps to this question

Postby scasplte2 » Sat Oct 01, 2011 12:25 pm

wow
Last edited by scasplte2 on Sun Oct 02, 2011 12:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

SSM
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Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 10:57 pm

Re: steps to this question

Postby SSM » Sat Oct 01, 2011 3:13 pm

bfollin, I think scasplte's comment was out of line and you're absolutely right on this one, for the record.

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grae313
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Re: steps to this question

Postby grae313 » Sat Oct 01, 2011 6:16 pm

scasplte2 wrote:bfollinprm you are the kind of person that makes this field so pretentious and unbearable sometimes.


Actually, bfollinprm gives up his own time to provide a large amount of excellent and patient advice on these forums. People shouldn't be asking us to help them cheat on their high school physics homework here.

TheBeast
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Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 12:06 am

Re: steps to this question

Postby TheBeast » Sat Oct 01, 2011 9:35 pm

I think that scasplte2's comment seems to indicate that he thought that the original question was with regards to a GRE physics style problem. If that were the case, I can understand bfollinprm's response seeming somewhat harsh.

However, I suspect that the original question was just an attempt to get a homework answer, in which case the response was justified (and entertaining).

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WhoaNonstop
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Re: steps to this question

Postby WhoaNonstop » Sun Oct 02, 2011 11:06 pm

bfollinprm wrote:1. Make your parents get you a tutor, and ask him these questions.


I will gladly do any of his problems for $5 a piece! No shame, gotta feed myself.

-Riley




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