University of Colorado at Boulder (MS/PhD - Physics)

  • Build school profiles for prospective graduate students.
  • Everyone is welcome to share their knowledge of schools.

CO
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri Feb 22, 2008 4:30 pm

University of Colorado at Boulder (MS/PhD - Physics)

Postby CO » Tue Feb 26, 2008 10:35 am

University of Colorado at Boulder (MS/PhD - Physics)
http://www.colorado.edu/physics/Web/
Boulder, CO


User avatar
InquilineKea
Posts: 301
Joined: Sun Mar 21, 2010 9:07 pm

Re: University of Colorado at Boulder (MS/PhD - Physics)

Postby InquilineKea » Sun Mar 20, 2011 5:27 pm

http://graduate-school.phds.org/ranking ... _________U

Does anyone know why Colorado scores so low for student outcomes? (for both astro and physics)

negru
Posts: 308
Joined: Wed Oct 13, 2010 3:49 pm

Re: University of Colorado at Boulder (MS/PhD - Physics)

Postby negru » Sun Mar 20, 2011 6:23 pm

because these rankings are worth 0.

places ive never heard about nor ever intend to hear about claim 50% of their students get academic jobs, while eg princeton has 16%? next unless im mistaken it looks like if a score is N/A for a school it counts as 100%.

ok i lied about the worth of these rankings. they are good for wiping your ass

negru
Posts: 308
Joined: Wed Oct 13, 2010 3:49 pm

Re: University of Colorado at Boulder (MS/PhD - Physics)

Postby negru » Sun Mar 20, 2011 6:46 pm

I'm probably guessing it's the old "OMG, rankings are coming -quick, count postdocs as faculty" trick some schools usually employ.

User avatar
HappyQuark
Posts: 762
Joined: Thu Apr 16, 2009 2:08 am

Re: University of Colorado at Boulder (MS/PhD - Physics)

Postby HappyQuark » Sun Mar 20, 2011 8:20 pm

There are any of a number of reasons that this could be the case. For example, students from lower ranked schools may either be getting their PhD with the intention of going into industry or may be more likely to abandon academia in favor of industry. In either case, going to industry typically results in higher student income and results in this income increase much faster than moving through multiple postdocs. These rankings also incorporate the amount of time it takes to get the degree and many schools push harder to make their PhD program a 4 or 5 year degree than a 6 or 7 year degree, which again results in more income for those few extra years.




Return to “Building Physics Graduate School Profiles”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest