Visual representation of particles

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Stelala
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jul 12, 2012 8:51 am

Visual representation of particles

Postby Stelala » Thu Jul 12, 2012 9:05 am

Hi there,

This might be quite unusual for a forum like this, but I have a kind of artsy question.

I'm doing this series of posters with particles and I wanted to know what is the expert advice on how would they look like.
Each poster will contain a graphical depiction of the particle, the place,team or the portrait of the individual who discovered it and some witty text at the bottom.

I'm doing research on what particles I should include right now, but a narrowed down list of the, let's say, most important particles would help me a lot (don't know by which criteria to select them, as I can do around 10 poster designs max and I want to keep it as close to science as I can).

Now, I imagine they would look like some sort of spheres, each with their own characteristics (I'd also like to picture their role somehow).
Would that be accurate? And if it is, what would you say, in layman's terms, would their role be?

The posters will be available on sale, so anyone can have a poster with his favorite particle. I'll post them here as soon as they're ready, hopefully soon with your help.

Thanks in advance and good day to you all!

User avatar
quizivex
Posts: 1029
Joined: Tue Jan 09, 2007 6:13 am

Re: Visual representation of particles

Postby quizivex » Thu Jul 12, 2012 1:35 pm

Stelala wrote:Now, I imagine they would look like some sort of spheres, each with their own characteristics (I'd also like to picture their role somehow). Would that be accurate?


Leading particle physicists have indicated that the "structure" of a large portion of the subatomic particles (the boson class) is more consistent with an icosahedron than a sphere.

Image

It might be more difficult to draw, but it'd be much more aesthetically appealing and physically accurate.




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