University of Waterloo:Quantum information

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bosemicrowave
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University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:05 pm

Can any Canadian here help me to know whether University of Waterloo(joined with Institute of Quantum computing) admits students during Spring and winter session for PHD program in Quantum information/Physics?
Regards.

TakeruK
Posts: 817
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2012 3:05 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby TakeruK » Wed Sep 04, 2013 6:43 pm

Short answer is yes -- you can start in September, May, or January (but they prefer Sept or May).

Just to be clear, the Institute of Quantum Computing itself does not grant your degree. Instead, you actually get your PhD through one of the participating universities/programs, such as the Physics PhD program at the University of Waterloo (other options are Chemistry, Computer Science, etc.). If you complete the Institute's requirements, you will earn an special "Quantum Information" designation on your PhD degree. (Source: http://iqc.uwaterloo.ca/welcome/graduate) So, you will want to apply to a Physics PhD program at Waterloo first, then worry about Quantum Information requirements later.

Also, if you are going the Physics route (sounds like you are), then you are actually applying to the Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute (http://gwp.on.ca/application/index.html). According to that page, you can actually enter the same graduate program via either the University of Waterloo or the University of Guelph. It sounds like no matter which school you officially apply to (and become a student of / get your degree from), you can work with faculty at either school. It would probably make the most sense to see which profs you are most interested in and pick the campus/school where they are physically located. On that linked page, it says that if you apply before Feb. 15, you will have first consideration for scholarships/fellowships but they will take applications all year. In addition, they say that they prefer Sept or May starts, but January is also possible.

Finally, it's useful to remember that in Canada, the standard path is do a BSc, then a MSc, then a PhD. Canadian students apply to grad school twice (BSc -> MSc and MSc -> PhD) even if they are applying to stay in the same school/program. This program states their requirements are:

An honours degree in physics or equivalent, with first or upper second class standing, is normally required for entry into an MSc program; an MSc degree from an approved university or college is normally required for entrance into a PhD program. It should be noted that students will be admitted to either of these research programs only if a advisor can be found for their research. Since there are a limited number of openings each year, applicants are advised to state alternative areas of research on the preference form or supplementary information form supplied.


An honours degree in physics in Canada is a 4 to 5 year undergrad degree with a research component (senior/honours thesis). A MSc degree in Canada is a 2-year degree usually with a formal thesis defense at the end (students generally start their Masters research within the first few months). There are a handful of classes to be taken at the same time as research, but it's not like US Masters programs where a Masters degree is mostly meeting course requirements.

You said that you were interested in the PhD program. I don't know your background, but if you don't have a masters degree or equivalent, then you will probably have to apply to the MSc program first, and then the PhD program afterwards.

bosemicrowave
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Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2013 4:33 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Thu Sep 05, 2013 2:54 pm

Thanks for your detailed explanation.Actually I have read those information but I'm still thinking about whether to apply for Atomic/molecular/optical or Quantum Computing or quantum optics or Quantum technology(i.e topics like Quantum cryptography).My background is in computer engineering and I've worked in fiber optics,nano tech but I've no undergraduate physics background.


Basically quantum computing is the quantum version of classical computer science which we studied in our undergraduate.

An analogy:classical mechanics:quantum mechanics::classical computer:quantum computer.

I am giving my PGRE on October this year and applying to several universities in AMO field but my passion is Quantum computing and Quantum technology for which I've been working over an year including publishing several theoretical papers and the only institute which has dedicated a singular program as Quantum computing is U.Waterloo and institute of Quantum computing.

So even if I get in lot better institute I would still opt for Waterloo for their Quantum Computing program.

blighter
Posts: 256
Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2012 6:30 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby blighter » Thu Sep 05, 2013 3:16 pm

bosemicrowave wrote:Basically quantum computing is the quantum version of classical computer science which we studied in our undergraduate.

An analogy:classical mechanics:quantum mechanics::classical computer:quantum computer.


Why would you explain that?

bosemicrowave
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2013 4:33 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Thu Sep 05, 2013 3:35 pm

In order to show my background. Haha.

Jokes apart,Quantum computing is the newest holy grail in physics and I'm sure you know that 2012 Nobel prize was awarded not only on quantum optics but it had more to to do with Quantum computing,i.e it would enable us to built the fastest atomic clock of the world.

D-wave,IQC, few top American universities and UNSW(Australia) are working on it but if there is any single institute dedicated only for Quantum computing then it's U Waterloo.

Thanks for your information.We had a nice discussion but I'm still skeptical that my non Physics background may play a role against my admission although deep down inside I know I have done work on this field than most of the Physics undergraduate students who are interested in this particular field...from the beginning of optical computing to latest developments like using of BEC in this particular field or several other algorithms...

These are kept in my twitter@bosemicrowave.

TakeruK
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby TakeruK » Thu Sep 05, 2013 4:33 pm

If you have no physics background, it might be a challenge to get into a Physics graduate program. Even if you have a lot of experience working with fiber optics, your course background might not be strong enough to prepare you for the other aspects of a PhD physics program (e.g. coursework in other subfields). I'm not sure what you're actually interested in.

If you want to do further research/work with quantum computing, wouldn't it make more sense to apply to a different degree instead of the Physics PhD? There are both computer science and computer engineering degrees that are connected to the Institute for Quantum Computing. You can get the QI designation on many different programs, as I said above!

If you want to actually do more work in Physics, then I think you might need to do more to demonstrate your qualifications than just the PGRE. Maybe you did take a lot of Physics electives in undergrad? I'm not saying it's impossible, but if you have no prior physics experience, it's hard to see U Waterloo accepting you into their Physics PhD program. As you said, it will definitely be a bad thing, but perhaps you can overcome it.

I don't know about U Waterloo specifically, but it is my opinion that the culture at many Canadian physics departments is that you are a Physicist first, and then [your sub-field, e.g. astronomer] second. That is, especially for admissions, I think schools would favour someone who is good at physics in general but might not know too much about their subfield over someone who isn't familiar with all of physics but has a ton of experience only in their subfield. I see this attitude manifest itself in most departmental policies. For example, at all schools I know of, all astronomy graduate students (who are almost always in the Physics department) must take Quantum Field Theory and/or Jackson-level E&M courses even if they have nothing to do with the student's particular research interests. Whenever these requirements are re-evaluated, there is great resistance from the profs against changing them and people often say what I said above ("physicist first, astronomer second"). I've met this perspective from a couple of different Canadian physics departments now and also have heard of it at other places too.

So, for a school like Waterloo, if you want to enter their Physics PhD program, you really need to demonstrate some equivalent physics knowledge to the stated requirements. Again, this is just my opinion provided for your consideration -- maybe I am wrong and you should do what you feel is best for yourself.

bosemicrowave
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Fri Sep 06, 2013 5:10 am

Good point.But I've taken all the undergraduate physics course work by self study and I followed the undergraduate level courses of MIT,UCB,Stanford etc.In fact I've taken some master level courses in mechanics or Mathematical physics.

My negative point is my non physics background but my strength is I already know everything about Quantum Computing since it's birth,so any physics major who will apply for this particular field can not have similar knowledge in classical computer and it's quantum version.

Optical fiber or fiber optics is very much related with Quantum computer technology but as you mentioned in order to impress Physics faculties one should demonstrate strong foundation in undergraduate physics where I've taken only 5-6 papers related to undergraduate physics.

general physics:Including Oscillatory motion,wave,optics,electrostatics and electromagnetism,diffraction,polarization and rest of the wave optics,elementary quantum physics.

One paper in engineering Mechanics and one paper in engineering Thermodynamics,electronics,semiconductor physics,basic electrical and network theory.

which means I have not taken undergraduate courses in statistical mechanics,higher level mechanics,higher level QM,special theory of relativity,particle physics,astrophysics,atomic physics etc.

But atomic and radio active part was completed in high school level so it's only higher level mechanics,QM and special topics where I had no background at undergraduate but I've completed those topics with self study.

blighter
Posts: 256
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby blighter » Fri Sep 06, 2013 5:27 am

bosemicrowave wrote:My negative point is my non physics background but my strength is I already know everything about Quantum Computing since it's birth,so any physics major who will apply for this particular field can not have similar knowledge in classical computer and it's quantum version.


Reading popular articles on Quantum Computation \not= knowing everything about quantum computation.

Also some of the best people for computer science as undergrads, that I know of, have been physics majors.

bosemicrowave
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Fri Sep 06, 2013 6:35 am

It's not quantum computation but I'm talking about quantum technology which will revolutionize the future world of technology.

for example a physics undergraduate student does not have iota of knowledge about system programming or what it's meant by Von Neumann architecture or what's the contribution of Alan Turing in computer science.You require quantum Von Neumann architecture in quantum computer which can't expect from a physics undergraduate student.

Similarly they are not aware about computer algorithm techniques which are required in quantum Computing.

for example how to solve a linear equation in Quantum Computer:

a physics major knows the Quantum physics and definitely knows how photon particle works but he does not know the Quantum algorithm technique using which you can solve the problem.

I think quantum computer is such a topic where you have to master both Physics and computer science.If you lack one of them then you are the footballer who has got great set piece movement in his left foot but can't convert a goal from 6 yard box using your right foot.

P-representation
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby P-representation » Fri Sep 06, 2013 6:53 am

...but my strength is I already know everything about Quantum Computing since it's birth,so any physics major who will apply for this particular field can not have similar knowledge in classical computer and it's quantum version.


Since you already know everything about quantum computing, I think you should rather apply for a professorship at IQC, or maybe even better, why not the directorship itself? I'm sure all of us on this forum would be delighted to hear about you have significantly advanced our knowledge of the quantum world.

But on a serious note, I doubt you will even find a single serious graduate student who would make as outrageous a statement as you have just made. Another humble request, stop shooting your mouth off on topics you have very little understanding of, such as the importance of the PGRE in graduate school admissions.

But yes,PGRE is the most important part and probably carries more than 50% weight in entire admission process while General GRE carries 20-25%(or even less) weight in entire admission process.


What exactly do you actually know about the graduate admissions process? Who on earth gave you such a ridiculous break-up? Do you have any personal experience to back-up such a claim i.e did you go through the process yourself once earlier?

I think such questions are answered best by current graduate students who have already gone through the process.

bosemicrowave
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Fri Sep 06, 2013 7:33 am

Agreed with PGRE objection because different universities have set up different benchmark for their admission.I have seen students from Electrical engineering background with very little research experience has qualified in top 20(for domestic male) or within 40 (international male) with PGRE score around 930-970 in US universities [fields were HEP,mathematical physics etc]


But could not agree anymore with your 1st objection related to my knowledge in field of quantum computing or quantum technology.

I never said I have mastered experimental part of quantum technology but I rather said I have accessed all theoretical concept in in this particular field.

FYI:And I think one requires knowledge in both general computer science and quantum physics[i.e for research in Quantum computing],otherwise he will find himself as a pipsqueak after couple of years of work who does not know which track to follow.This is the experience for couple of guys who have already working in that field(not in Waterloo though).

I hope my explanation will not create anymore outrage among any other forum members here.

blighter
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby blighter » Fri Sep 06, 2013 12:43 pm

bosemicrowave wrote:It's not quantum computation but I'm talking about quantum technology which will revolutionize the future world of technology.

for example a physics undergraduate student does not have iota of knowledge about system programming or what it's meant by Von Neumann architecture or what's the contribution of Alan Turing in computer science.You require quantum Von Neumann architecture in quantum computer which can't expect from a physics undergraduate student.

Similarly they are not aware about computer algorithm techniques which are required in quantum Computing.

for example how to solve a linear equation in Quantum Computer:

a physics major knows the Quantum physics and definitely knows how photon particle works but he does not know the Quantum algorithm technique using which you can solve the problem.

I think quantum computer is such a topic where you have to master both Physics and computer science.If you lack one of them then you are the footballer who has got great set piece movement in his left foot but can't convert a goal from 6 yard box using your right foot.


Actually this is what I meant when I was saying about physics majors having a very good understanding of Computer Science. You claim to have studied all of physics on your own and yet you find it easy to dismiss any physics majors who know CS very well. That's hypocritical on your part.

TakeruK
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby TakeruK » Fri Sep 06, 2013 1:45 pm

bosemicrowave wrote:for example a physics undergraduate student does not have iota of knowledge about system programming or what it's meant by Von Neumann architecture or what's the contribution of Alan Turing in computer science.You require quantum Von Neumann architecture in quantum computer which can't expect from a physics undergraduate student.

Similarly they are not aware about computer algorithm techniques which are required in quantum Computing.

for example how to solve a linear equation in Quantum Computer:


I agree! But I think you are missing the point of an undergraduate and graduate degree here. An undergraduate degree is supposed to introduce you to your general field of work. A graduate degree is where one specialises. An undergraduate degree prepares you for graduate level work -- it's the graduate degree that actually prepares you to do real research work!

So while it's great that you know all of the computer science background, it's my opinion that it's not going to be a huge factor in gaining admission to the Physics PhD program. The Physics students you speak of that don't know all the computer science stuff will learn the necessary background during graduate school when they specialise in quantum computing.

a physics major knows the Quantum physics and definitely knows how photon particle works but he does not know the Quantum algorithm technique using which you can solve the problem.

I think quantum computer is such a topic where you have to master both Physics and computer science.If you lack one of them then you are the footballer who has got great set piece movement in his left foot but can't convert a goal from 6 yard box using your right foot.


I also agree here! Quantum Computing is definitely a multi-disciplinary field. It requires advanced knowledge of both Physics and Computer Science. I'm also working in a similarly multi-disciplinary field. But, at the undergraduate level, it is unlikely that any student will know both topics at the level you are suggesting. Like I said above, you don't enter graduate school knowing everything about your subfield -- if so, you might as well be a professor! Instead, generally students start with a general background in one of the field (e.g. Physics or Computer Science) and then in graduate school, branch out and start applying their prior knowledge into a new field.

From what I've read, it sounds like the Institute's program is designed to bring together experts in each of the important fields of Quantum Computing (i.e. computer engineering, physics, computer science, mathematics) in order to pool their expertise and solve the multi-disciplinary problems. This suggests that you should join the Institute as a member of the department where your expertise actually lies. From your description of your background, it makes much more sense for you to join the graduate programs through Waterloo's Computer Science or Computer Engineering program and then contribute to the field of Quantum Computing through both your formal education and experience in computer engineering as well as your self-study knowledge of Physics. The Waterloo Physics PhD students would join the Institute not knowing a huge amount of computer science (but will learn it along the way) but their contribution would to be bring Physics knowledge into the Institute.

From your writing, it also sounds like what you would actually desire is a specific department that will blend together Physics and Computer Science into Quantum Computing. It sounds like your ideal graduate degree would be one in Quantum Information or Quantum Computing, instead of your current options (i.e. PhD in computer science working in quantum computing or PhD in physics working in quantum computing). Maybe these types of programs exist elsewhere, and I think the IQC is probably how such a program might begin in Canada.

bosemicrowave
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Sun Sep 08, 2013 10:01 am

@TakeruK.
Thanks dear.You are the only person who understands what quantum computing is all about.yesterday I was writing a paper about how quantum cryptography can be safely used but it gave me little hard time cause although I know about cryptography but quantum cryptography has different phenomena.

Those who have knowledge about artificial intelligence or even Chess programming(although I know very little about chess programming) may understand that quantum computing is almost a similar kind of phenomena where we are representing the old ideas through a different mechanism.

A Quantum computer can run 1000 times faster than a classical computer which means many of our super computer today have less efficiency than an ordinary quantum computer.

But I agree with you that perhaps I have thought beyond a certain level because people of my age(or even seniors) are not thinking that far away.Actually if one reads all the publication related to this field on Nature then his interest will definitely grow.Even Phys.org ,Science daily,IEEE are publishing regular articles on it....trust me even if you are a HEP or Astro guy,you will still fall for this topic(as I said newest holy grail of physics and technology).

Even quantum cryptography can be used in mobile phone which will make current machines 20-50 times faster.And may be very soon quantum calculator will be invented...so if everything goes properly within 20-30 yrs. another technological revolution may occur.

For details you can visit you tube lectures of Michio Kaku.

And more importantly I'm not exactly applying for Physics PHD because IQC has given the program name as "Quantum information science"(not physics PHD) but you are right that other universities have no such option and I will have to apply AMO,specializing with Quantum optics.

bosemicrowave
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Sun Sep 08, 2013 10:18 am

One more thing:Actually IQC has created different dept. for different subjects.

I.e,they have Quantum Cryptography

Quantum computing

Quantum information processing

Quantum information processing(nano electronics based)

Quantum algorithm

Quantum complexity.

Other topics include photonics. or nano tech.

So they are not doing a traditional research on AMO,instead they have made specialization of every single sub topics which is awesome.

blighter
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby blighter » Sun Sep 08, 2013 11:32 am

bosemicrowave wrote:@TakeruK.
A Quantum computer can run 1000 times faster than a classical computer which means many of our super computer today have less efficiency than an ordinary quantum computer.


[Citation needed]

TakeruK
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Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2012 3:05 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby TakeruK » Sun Sep 08, 2013 12:01 pm

bosemicrowave wrote:And more importantly I'm not exactly applying for Physics PhD because IQC has given the program name as "Quantum information science"(not physics PHD) but you are right that other universities have no such option and I will have to apply AMO,specializing with Quantum optics.


I am afraid that you might be misunderstanding how the IQC program works. This is from their program website (emphasis added):
Students are required to complete the requirements of both their home unit and the specific requirements of the quantum information (QI) program to achieve the special QI designation. (E.g., MMath in Computer Science (Quantum Information), PhD in Chemistry (Quantum Information), MASc in Electrical and Computer Engineering (Quantum Information)).


I would interpret this paragraph as saying that the students who work at the IQC on their PhDs are actually affiliated with various other departments at Waterloo (e.g. Computer Science, Chemistry, Physics, etc.). That is, I do not think the IQC does not directly offer an entire PhD program simply in quantum computing. Instead, you must first join Waterloo's graduate program in one of the affiliated departments and then complete extra requirements with the IQC in order to get the QI designation on your degree. I think this is correct because of the above paragraph but also because:

1. This page explains the admissions process to IQC: http://iqc.uwaterloo.ca/welcome/graduate/admissions Note that it says you must apply and be accepted by one of the affiliated departments, not by IQC directly.

2. This page explains the requirements for the QI designation: http://iqc.uwaterloo.ca/welcome/graduate/requirements Note that there are only two core courses -- the rest of the course requirements depend on what department the student is affiliated with. The total number of required QI courses is 4 (the remaining 2 are chosen based on courses offered by the IQC and/or cross-listed between the IQC and the student's home department). The student will also have to complete whatever course requirements to get a PhD from their home department. Thus, another sign that the IQC QI program is not a stand-alone PhD program.

3. This is a list of current IQC PhD students: https://services.iqc.uwaterloo.ca/peopl ... -students/ For most of the names, clicking on them only reveals very basic information. But a few names have links to URLs and CVs or a longer description. In these cases, when they mention the degree they are doing, it is always a PhD in [home unit, e.g. Physics] and their research is in quantum information.

4. This is a list of their faculty: http://iqc.uwaterloo.ca/faculty-research Note that every one of them is from a department like "Physics & Astronomy".

So, I think it is correct to say that the IQC does not have its own graduate program. Instead, it is a place where people (students and faculty) from related departments interested in quantum computing collaborate together and work on problems in quantum information science.

bosemicrowave wrote:One more thing:Actually IQC has created different dept. for different subjects.

I.e,they have Quantum Cryptography

Quantum computing

Quantum information processing

Quantum information processing(nano electronics based)

Quantum algorithm

Quantum complexity.

Other topics include photonics. or nano tech.

So they are not doing a traditional research on AMO,instead they have made specialization of every single sub topics which is awesome.


Again, I think you are misunderstanding this list. From the IQC website, they list these topics as areas where they have research expertise, not actual departments solely focused on this topic. If you click on these research areas and read which faculty does work in which area, you will see some names appearing in many places. For example, Jonathan Baugh appears on both nanoelectronics-based and spin-based quantum information processing. I think this list is created by looking at all the research areas covered by faculty working with the IQC and then dividing them up into nice little compartments to help others understand what type of work is done at the IQC.

However, you are right that the IQC does more than just AMO, which is usually the extent of quantum computing at other schools. Instead of just being a small part of a single department, the IQC sounds like an awesome place where resources and expertise from many different fields are working together. But if you are interested in working there, you should understand that you need to apply to one of the affiliated programs, not the IQC directly. At least, that's my interpretation (and explanation is above) -- do let us know if you find evidence otherwise!

bosemicrowave
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Sun Sep 08, 2013 3:13 pm

@TakeruK

I have read that too.In fact they are working jointly with computer science and electrical engineering departments.But I saw their main heading showing research in Quantum information science but you are right that University of Waterloo page is showing that PHD in physics.Now since IQC is jointly working with Waterloo may be you are right that I will have to apply for Physics PHD.

But I asked few of their students through twitter and they told me that during application they specified research area as Quantum Computing.Even in this forum couple of students of 2012-13 wrote in their profile that they are applying for quantum computing.


Now my question is if someone is applying for quantum computing with computer science background,then isn't it an edge over someone who is coming from Physics background?

Off course the computer science major will have to show higher level of proficiency in Physics but i have taken many undergraduate level Physics course and most of the topics were even covered during high school/physics Olympiad curriculum.Now PGRE is extremely vital but apart from advanced QM,relativity,particle physics,astrophysics,experimental I have done rest of the topics during my undergraduate.

Now the point you made here that Physics department requires strong understanding in Physics topics:I have to say apart from application part of QM or little bit of statistical mechanics,others topics have not given me any tough time.Even with QM if it does not give you hard times then you haven't learn anything about QM(In words of SIR Richard Feynman).

But somehow I will have to demonstrate that I'm not lagging that any physics major,instead I have taken some graduate level courses in mechanics and thermodynamics,string theory(although it's not required anymore).




"citation required"_

The easiest way to know about it is to read the elementary topics on Quantum computer(if you read Nature then it would be best). :) Otherwise MIT technology news or PHYS.ORG articles



I can still tell you the basic difference between classical computer and Quantum computer:

In classical computer we use either 0 or 1 at same time but in quantum computer we can use both 0 and 1 at same time.The Qbit or qubit,which is the basic unit in quantum information in Quantum computer is the fundamental part of this technology.The most fundamental type of computing is so far optical computing which started long time ago(around 2000/01).Now just like the probabilistic nature of quantum physics,Quantum computing has also some critical problems and the job of the researcher is how to get rid of those problems.This is why they are working on different quantum algorithms technique,cooling molecules,quantum optics to develop most feasible form of Quantum computer which would enable us to develop 1000 times faster computer than today's classical computer we use.

Even L.Martin,NASA,GOOGLE etc have already invested on Quantum computing technique.you can see NASA_Supercomputing on twitter

blighter
Posts: 256
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Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby blighter » Sun Sep 08, 2013 7:28 pm

bosemicrowave wrote:"citation required"_

The easiest way to know about it is to read the elementary topics on Quantum computer(if you read Nature then it would be best). :) Otherwise MIT technology news or PHYS.ORG articles



I can still tell you the basic difference between classical computer and Quantum computer:

In classical computer we use either 0 or 1 at same time but in quantum computer we can use both 0 and 1 at same time.The Qbit or qubit,which is the basic unit in quantum information in Quantum computer is the fundamental part of this technology.The most fundamental type of computing is so far optical computing which started long time ago(around 2000/01).Now just like the probabilistic nature of quantum physics,Quantum computing has also some critical problems and the job of the researcher is how to get rid of those problems.This is why they are working on different quantum algorithms technique,cooling molecules,quantum optics to develop most feasible form of Quantum computer which would enable us to develop 1000 times faster computer than today's classical computer we use.

Even L.Martin,NASA,GOOGLE etc have already invested on Quantum computing technique.you can see NASA_Supercomputing on twitter


I most certainly did not ask you to explain quantum computation to me.

You seem to pull numbers out of your ass when you claim:

A Quantum computer can run 1000 times faster than a classical computer which means many of our super computer today have less efficiency than an ordinary quantum computer.


This is definitely not shown to be the case AFAIK. If that is something I'm unaware about, I need a reference for that. Quantum Computers definitely solve certain problems faster. But faster than a classical computer for any problem? That at least hasn't been shown to be true. Also saying something is "1000 times" faster doesn't even make sense. The quantum computers in their current state are completely useless. So, saying that they are "1000 times" faster than a classical computer is foolish, at best.

What I think is that you've just learnt the buzz words and keep using them everywhere to sound intelligent.

TakeruK
Posts: 817
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2012 3:05 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby TakeruK » Mon Sep 09, 2013 1:57 am

bosemicrowave wrote:But I asked few of their students through twitter and they told me that during application they specified research area as Quantum Computing.Even in this forum couple of students of 2012-13 wrote in their profile that they are applying for quantum computing.


Yes, this is normal -- when you apply to grad schools, you usually specify your interests and where you would like to work. You might not necessarily be able to get accepted or find a supervisor in this field. Also, this isn't the same as applying to quantum computing directly, it is applying for a Physics program in order to work in quantum computing.

Now my question is if someone is applying for quantum computing with computer science background,then isn't it an edge over someone who is coming from Physics background?


For a physics program, no, it would not. A computer science undergraduate does not even meet the minimum requirements listed by Waterloo to enter their Physics PhD program. Of course, there may be ways to be granted an exception, but that definitely doesn't give you an edge over a student with a Physics BSc or MSc. Like I said above and like you have said, quantum computing is more than just computer science with quantum computers. The program is not necessarily looking for someone with your exact experience/skills. They are in general looking for the best Physicists to join their PhD program, so the best way to improve your chances in a Physics PhD program is to have a strong Physics background. If a student was a Physics major with a Computer Science minor, or a combined majors program for both Physics and Computer Science, then that would be great. But there are parts of quantum computing that is more about the physical phenomena, or even just studying the physics of a system that can be applied to quantum computing but not actually working with any "quantum computers".

Off course the computer science major will have to show higher level of proficiency in Physics but i have taken many undergraduate level Physics course and most of the topics were even covered during high school/physics Olympiad curriculum.Now PGRE is extremely vital but apart from advanced QM,relativity,particle physics,astrophysics,experimental I have done rest of the topics during my undergraduate.

Now the point you made here that Physics department requires strong understanding in Physics topics:I have to say apart from application part of QM or little bit of statistical mechanics,others topics have not given me any tough time.Even with QM if it does not give you hard times then you haven't learn anything about QM(In words of SIR Richard Feynman).

But somehow I will have to demonstrate that I'm not lagging that any physics major,instead I have taken some graduate level courses in mechanics and thermodynamics,string theory(although it's not required anymore).


Okay, now you are talking useful stuff! Earlier in this thread, you said you had zero undergraduate physics experience. I know you have also said that you took a lot of these course materials online, which isn't going to be as helpful as if you had taken all of these courses as electives in your undergraduate degree or at some other point in your education. I would say normally Canadian universities want Physics undergrads, or at least taken almost the equivalent courses as a Physics major. You might be able to convince the admissions committee to accept something else (experience, online courses etc.) if you can demonstrate ability. But this might be very hard to do and it will definitely put you at a huge disadvantage to someone with little computer science training but who actually has a Physics BSc. That other person is a guarantee that they have been trained the way the professor expects Physics BSc's to be trained. You would be more of a risk -- so I would say you definitely would not have an edge.

I think that the general model for physicists working on quantum information is that they are applying physics to tackle the issues in computing. They primarily know physics, not the other way around. These physicists would not need to know a lot of computer science and can probably pick up what they need to know with a few introductory courses and a few months working on their project. I'm not saying that all physicists do not know or have formal training in computer sciences, but many do not.

Again, with your experience and your interests, it really does sound like you should be in the computer science or computer engineering PhD programs and work on quantum information from that angle. Or, if you are set on being a physicist, then maybe fully going into the Physics path (e.g. a BS or MS in physics) might be the better route.

bosemicrowave
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2013 4:33 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Wed Oct 16, 2013 11:47 am

blighter wrote:
bosemicrowave wrote:"citation required"_

The easiest way to know about it is to read the elementary topics on Quantum computer(if you read Nature then it would be best). :) Otherwise MIT technology news or PHYS.ORG articles



I can still tell you the basic difference between classical computer and Quantum computer:

In classical computer we use either 0 or 1 at same time but in quantum computer we can use both 0 and 1 at same time.The Qbit or qubit,which is the basic unit in quantum information in Quantum computer is the fundamental part of this technology.The most fundamental type of computing is so far optical computing which started long time ago(around 2000/01).Now just like the probabilistic nature of quantum physics,Quantum computing has also some critical problems and the job of the researcher is how to get rid of those problems.This is why they are working on different quantum algorithms technique,cooling molecules,quantum optics to develop most feasible form of Quantum computer which would enable us to develop 1000 times faster computer than today's classical computer we use.

Even L.Martin,NASA,GOOGLE etc have already invested on Quantum computing technique.you can see NASA_Supercomputing on twitter


I most certainly did not ask you to explain quantum computation to me.

You seem to pull numbers out of your ass when you claim:

A Quantum computer can run 1000 times faster than a classical computer which means many of our super computer today have less efficiency than an ordinary quantum computer.


This is definitely not shown to be the case AFAIK. If that is something I'm unaware about, I need a reference for that. Quantum Computers definitely solve certain problems faster. But faster than a classical computer for any problem? That at least hasn't been shown to be true. Also saying something is "1000 times" faster doesn't even make sense. The quantum computers in their current state are completely useless. So, saying that they are "1000 times" faster than a classical computer is foolish, at best.

What I think is that you've just learnt the buzz words and keep using them everywhere to sound intelligent.
Well i f you are still searching what Quantum computer is all about,i.e whether it's a name of a fast food or something else then visit this blog_chakrabortysampan.blogspot.in

I gave you my twitter account but you probably did not visit it.

Speaking of stupidity:If you ask me a question why 1 came after 0,then why 2 came after 1,and so on...And then you tell me to show a proof about it then don't you think you are asking an extremely delusional question?Similarly if I tell you to show me a proof that Newton discovered his laws of gravitation only after he saw that apple fell from the tree,then can you show me a proof?

A Quantum computer can have efficiency 1000 times more than a classical computer-this article was published nearly 10 years ago when researchers were working on adiabatic computing.I definitely have kept all those materials or papers with me for sure...If you ask me a question who stated QED first(i.e Dirac or Feynman),then I definitely can't show you any concrete proof that long before Feynman Dirac started working on it.I hope you get my point.For details on Quantum computer you visit @QuantumIQC @quantumlah @iqoqi on twitter or read my post.

bosemicrowave
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2013 4:33 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Wed Oct 16, 2013 12:18 pm

OK.i have got one article from my tweeter account which will answer your question:feasibility of Quantum Computer can be 1000 times more than a classical computer but remember we are still in imaginary world,we have not built it yet.

Here is the article:A Quantum leap in computing-www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/elements/2013/05/a-quantum-leap-in-computing.html

This is an ordinary article but for beginners like you it's the simplest to understand.

blighter
Posts: 256
Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2012 6:30 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby blighter » Wed Oct 16, 2013 1:00 pm

bosemicrowave wrote:OK.i have got one article from my tweeter account which will answer your question:feasibility of Quantum Computer can be 1000 times more than a classical computer but remember we are still in imaginary world,we have not built it yet.

Here is the article:A Quantum leap in computing-www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/elements/2013/05/a-quantum-leap-in-computing.html

This is an ordinary article but for beginners like you it's the simplest to understand.


:D You crack me up!

Did you even read that article yourself? Where in that article do they even mention the computers being 1000 times faster?

bosemicrowave
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2013 4:33 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:35 am

Dude Wake up.Either you have terrible reading comprehension skill or you are partly insane.Where did we say that Quantum Computer has 1000 times more efficiency than classical one.We haven't built it yet.In all articles related to Nature photonics researchers have claimed QC can have 1000 times more efficiency than classical one-Even I have read they claimed an ordinary QC can be more efficient than the biggest super computers of today(follow NASA Super computing).Recently Google And NASA jointly bought a system from D-wave with newest technological aspects.

Researchers are still working on this field and all those 1000/2000 times are not words put by me but those were were claims by researchers..now if you call it FAIK then isn't it better to restrict yourself in your own world where you love to be.

I will discuss it on detail on Sunday.

Good bye.

blighter
Posts: 256
Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2012 6:30 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby blighter » Fri Oct 18, 2013 9:43 am

bosemicrowave wrote:In all articles related to Nature photonics researchers have claimed QC can have 1000 times more efficiency than classical one


Again just words. Which articles?

bosemicrowave
Posts: 27
Joined: Mon Jul 29, 2013 4:33 pm

Re: University of Waterloo:Quantum information

Postby bosemicrowave » Sun Oct 20, 2013 11:56 am

I most certainly did not ask you to explain me quantum computation:(post by blighter)

Idiotic.It is not computation but one of the computing viz:optical computing or adiabatic computing.Before talking with me you should better read the post of Taker Uk who has already differentiated between Quantum computing and computation but I do believe you don't have iota of knowledge about that difference.

strictly speaking instead of Computing or computation we should rather use the word quantum information-i.e it's the father and Quantum computing ,Quantum cryptography,quantum teleportation etc are children of quantum information.

Speaking of articles I just read an article where D-wave system has claimed that there Quantum computer can be 3600 times faster than our classical computer.remember I'm not saying they have built it but there are certain claims by certain researchers that Qc can be fabricated by more advanced technology.Even in this article there are other groups who are claiming that it's not even Quantum computer because classical algorithms may deduce it's speed lot lesser than 3600 times.

When it comes to Nature articles I can't post it on Internet,you better subscribe and start reading else isn't it better to stop this insane fight.

Here is the article-Math master:D-wave device is powerful,but is it Quantum Computing?-author Sophie Bushwick via @foxnews.

I will provide you more articles related on it as more information/development occurs in this field of research.

You can also join Google+ CQT or IQC or several other groups created by researchers in this field.If you don't believe me then you can ask other experts on this field about the status of Quantum computer,it's feasibility.

Bye.




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